Thirteen Years Without Peter King – Chords

Thirteen Years Without Peter King
written by World/Inferno Friendship Society
transcribed for solo guitar by Anna Lawrence

CAPO 1 (sounding key is fm)

em
The years are short just as the day is long
It was me on the corner
It was only me when you were looking
am        G        B        em
Not to kneel to anyone else, get it Pete

em
It's been thirteen years and a couple of days
since that cab blew that light and dragged you away from us.
                                  am          G              B
And I still wonder what you might think, what you might say
em
It's been thirteen years and a couple of days.

		           am
And now it's far too late to go
D		    G    G/F#   em
No one ever saw the show
			    am
Blame the witches blame the saints
			     B
No one cares which ones are fake
		         em
And we'll never need to know.

		      am
It was far to soon to go
D		         G     G/F#    em
You never get to see the show
                             am
Call all the witches and the saints
				           B
The ones who were real, the ones who were fake
                       em
Call them and let them know

em
Would you want to play along
Would you approve but now you're gone
                                  am
So I'll never know the jokes, the lengths
      G            B               em
To which you might go, I'll never know

It's been thirteen years and a couple of days
Knocked out of your boots and flown through the air
                              am    G      B       em
Ending conversations now I'll never get to hear

		   am
It was far to soon to go
D		           G     G/F#    em
You never got to see the show
                               am
Call all the witches, call the saints
				           B
The ones who were real, the ones who were fake
                        em
Call them and let them know

                             am
And now it's far too late to go
D 				             G     G/F#    em
We've missed the parties, we've missed the shows
			          am
Dancing for witches, guilt's for saints
		       B
Who cares more is a debate
                        em
And I guess I'll never know

VIBES SOLO (verse progression x2)
HORN SOLO (chorus progression)

		         am
Now it's far too late to go
D		      G     G/F#    em
No one ever saw the show
                          am
Blame the witches and the saints
			     B
No one cares which ones are fake
		       em
And we never need to know

                             am
No, no it's far too soon to go
D				         G   G/F#   em
Don't miss the parties, don't miss the shows
			        am
Dance with witches, drink with saints
			    B
Do you care which ones are fake
	               em
If we go we'll never know

And if you can’t believe that this could possibly be correct, please be sure to check out the video here:

Roman Numerals

Before we begin, I need to talk about pitch, and then perfect pitch.

Essentially, pitch is how high or how low a sound is.  Women’s voices generally have high pitches; men have low pitches.  While there are practically an infinite amount of pitches that can and cannot be heard (think of dog whistles, as one example), all pitches fall into the same 12 pitch classes.  If you can imagine a keyboard, it is made up of these pitches – A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.  These are the white keys.  The black keys represent sharps and flats, which is a WHOLE other post altogether.  Suffice it to say, an A sharp (A#) is not the same as an A, but apparently not different enough to be given it’s own name.

You might be thinking that this altogether does not make sense.  If there are 88 different tones on a piano, why not give them 88 different names?  Have you ever tried to remember 88 different names simeltaneously?  While all the notes are distinctly different, certain of these notes vibrate in similar ways, so that musicians and scientists alike have come to recognize that even though this key “down here” and this key “up here” are very far apart, they are the same note.  Sound is essentially vibration that your ear translates into a sound in your head, and the way vibrations go, without getting to heady and scientific on you, is that if you play any A on the keyboard, and then play the very next A up on the keyboard, the higher note is vibrating twice as fast as the lower note.  It is in this way that they are related.  A 2 to 1 ratio is a very simple ratio, and so they are considered the same note, or belong to the same pitch class, even though they are 12 keys apart on the keyboard. So even though there are an infinite amount of pitches, we can still classify them all into just 12 groups.

Perfect pitch is the ability to hear any tone and know, without any prompting, what the name of the note is.  It is a skill that not every musician possesses, and to be honest, perfect pitch is again, a whole other post i could write.  However, I won’t.  I bring up perfect pitch because of a musician’s ability to recognize a note in any context, and without any other reference point.  I liken it to an artist who can tell the difference between yellow and burnt umber, for example, without any reference except their own memory.

Perfect pitch doesn’t seem to come with the territory of being a professional musician.  There are pros who have perfect pitch, and there are also people who do not have any musical talent whatsoever who have the ability to distinguish between notes (I once heard of a person who actually could identify pitches by their MHz, or frequency). But the majority of people do not have the ability to just pull the name of a note or a chord out of thin air.

So for the rest of us, there are Roman numerals.

Most people are familiar with Roman numerals.  I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII are the ones musicians use most.  These are, of course, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7.  Roman numerals have the distinct ability, unlike our European numbers, of being either uppercase or lowercase. Uppercase Roman numerals represent major chords, and appear like this:

I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII

Meanwhile, the lowercase numbers represent minor chords, and look like this.

i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii

The advantage of using Roman numerals to talk about chords is that one does not need perfect pitch to recognize a chord naming it by its Roman numeral. Roman numerals represent the way a chord functions within the world of that specific song.  a I chord will always sound like a I chord.  A vi chord will also, always sound like a vi chord.  On the other hand, a C Major chord can have a few different functions depending on what key it is in.  And even if you can pick out the C Major chord in a song, you may not be able to figure out what the other chords are.  being able to identify the function of a chord, on the other hand, can help you identify other chords as well.  It’s like working on a puzzle.  If you can find one piece, you can usually then plug a few more into place based on that.

Roman numerals specifically come in handy when listening to a song you have never heard before, but want to learn (and cannot find on ultimate-guitar.com, probably one of my favorite guitar sites).  Once you start being able to recognize the functions of chords in a song, it is much easier to play a song and identify it.

Another good use for Roman numerals is for ease of transposition.  Say you have a diva of a singer who refuses to sing whatever song you’re working on with her in whatever key you’ve got it in.  If you know the chord progression in Roman numerals, it’s much easier to put the song in the key your diva needs it in instead of changing the chords as you go along.

Hopefully, though, you will come across the first situation much more often than the second. 😉

This blog will regularly go into Roman numeral analysis for songs, but will also go over Roman numerals themselves more in the future as well.

Only Anarchists are Pretty – Chords

Only Anarchists are Pretty
World Inferno

AbM EbM fm
If we should be arrested before we sleep
I’ll see you outside in a few days or in a few weeks
And if you should be shot trying to escape
I’ll know that for the lie that’s written on its face (well alright)

AbM EbM fm x 4

AbM EbM fm
And if we don’t live to be old and faint
It will be because we got lazy and forgot to get away
When we were young, you were the best thing going
And I struggled mightily to keep my hands to myself
Watching you strut down the street telling everyone to go to hell

CM CM/B BbM FM x 2
With a flash of the ankle, snarl of the lip
CM CM/B BbM FM dm GM dm GM
I see you in the street and gasp

AbM EbM fm
A lot of gossip and glances, I’d had enough
I grasped you gently by your arm and said, “Hey, I got a crush”
You caught both my eyes and you gave me a push
You said, “Hey, you got one back”
And the room caved in

CM CM/B BbM FM x 2
With a flash of the ankle, snarl of the lip
CM CM/B BbM FM dm GM
I see you in the street and gasp

CM FM am D7
((Cause only anarchists are, only anarchists are
Only anarchists are pretty)) x2

AbM EbM fm
After a lot of gossip and glances, your boyfriend got upset
He punched me squarely in my snout and said, “Hey! You got a debt!”
I turned my eyes into slits and I gave him a kick
I said, “Hey! You want one back?”
And the room caved in

CM CM/B BbM FM x 2
With a flash of the ankle, snarl of the lip
CM CM/B BbM FM dm GM
I see you in the street and gasp

CM FM am D7
CM AbM FM D7 (this progression repeats until end)
Cause only anarchists are, only anarchists are
Only anarchists are pretty

(solo)
CM FM am D7
CM AbM FM D7 x 2

there’s the riff that’s in triplet at the very end. starts on a D7 (play it in root position) and slides up a half step on each triplet eighth note.
D7/D#7/E7, F7/F#7/G7, G#7/A7/A#7, B7 (B7 being the one you hold out).

(chorus) x 3249854873, or something like that.

end with the triplets: D7/D#7/E7, F7/F#7/G7, G#7/A7/A#7, B7

And now, just in case you think I’m lying that these are all the correct chords, please, have a listen for yourself:

Only Anarchists are Pretty